Monday, February 27, 2017

RIP Bill Paxton



American film and TV actor Bill Paxton died from complications after heart surgery on February 25th. He was 61. Born William Paxton in Fort Worth, Texas on May 17, 1955 he moved to Los Angeles, California at age 18, where he found work in the film industry as a set dresser for Roger Corman's New World Pictures. He made his film debut in the Corman film “Crazy Mama” (1975), directed by Jonathan Demme. Moving to New York, Paxton studied acting under Stella Adler at New York University. After landing a small role in Stripes (1981), he found steady work in low-budget films and television. He also directed, wrote and produced award-winning short films including Fish Heads (1980), which aired on Saturday Night Live (1975). He’s best remembered for his roles as Morgan Earp in 1993’s “Tombstone”, “Apollo 13” (1995) and “True Lies” (1994). Bill appeared as Randall McCoy in the TV miniseries "Hatfields & McCoys" which was filmed in Romania.

The Native Americans



The Native Americans – English title

A 1994, French production [Studio T, Studio Canal, Trans Pacific Film, Canal + (Paris)]
Producers: Patricia Foulkrod, Michael Grant
Directors: John Borden , Phil Lucas, George Burdeau
Teleplay: N. Scott Momaday (Navarre Scott Momaday), Trip Gabriel, Linda Hogan, Hanay Geiogamah, Michael Grant, Mara Manus
Photography:
Music: Robbie Robertson and the Red Road Ensemble
Songs: Ulali, Priscilla Coolidge, Rita Coolidge, Silve Cloud Singers, Delphine Robertson, Robbie Robertson, Laura Satterfield
Running time: 3 episodes x 120 minutes

Cast: 
Narrator – Joy Harjo
Nick Clark, Paula Dove Jennings, Oren Lyons, Audrey Shenandoah, Tom Porter, Peter Jemison, Jake Swamp, John Mohawk, Alan Cook, Gary Whitedeer (Gary White Deer), Wilma Mankiller, Sara Parker, Ken York, Bobbie Joseph, Pilulaw Khus, Jewel James, Alan ‘Hodge’ Skickpoo Jr., Judy Trejo, Alfonso Ortiz, Bob Haozous, Radford Quahmahangnewa, Grace McNeley, Verna Williamson, Charlotte Black Elk, Lawrence Hart, Wallace Coffey, Horse Capture, Darrell Kipp



A three-part, six-hour documentary telling the story of the Native American nations, from the perspective of Native Americans. Divided into six segments, each analyzing a different geographic section of the United States, the special explores the history of different Native American cultures and presents "councils" of tribal leaders sharing their thoughts on that heritage.

European Western Comic Books ~ Kansas Kid



The Kansas Kid was a western adventurer who helped tame the West. He fought outlaws, conmen and bandits who terrorized the Wild West. He would team up with lawmen, the army and an occasional sidekick when needed to help them and himself in his heroic stand against lawbreakers.  




The Kansas Kid was a weekly issued comic from January 1948 – February 1950
There were only 8 pages per issue and the size was small and was published by Ricciardelli Mauro in Milan, Italy with artwork by Stefano Piselli. The character was created by Carlo Cossio It would be eventually published in Italian, French, English.



Carlo Cossio was born in Udine, Italy on January 1, 1907. He was an animator and cartoonist.

Carlo had two brothers Gino and Vittorio. He began his career making, together with Vittorio, some animated short films, beginning in 1928, mainly one reelers.

Later he devoted himself to comics, working in small fumettos; later the fascist regime censored all foreign comics, and Carlo Cossio was among the authors who created Italians heroes; such as Dick Lightning (written by Vincenzo Baggioli ) in 1938 and published on L'Audace . He continued to work on comic books and strips until 1955.

Cossio created many other characters including: Furio Almirante (1940), Tanks, the Man of Steel (1945), The Kansas Kid (1947), and Buffalo Bill (1951).

He also designed the stories Gim Toro and, among the last works before his death, a register called Kolosso. Cossio died in Milan, Italy on August 10, 1964.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Spaghetti Western Locations



We continue to our search for filming locations for the 1966 film “Navajo Joe”. Duncan and his gang ride into Esperanza with Dr. Lynne as prisoner. They go ride up to the bank and go inside. When Lynne opens the bank vault it is empty. Now in a rage Duncan demands to know where the money is. As Lynne move to the door in order to find his wife and the whereabouts of the money he is shot twice by Duncan. Lynne’s wife watching from their house next to the bank sees her husband shot and runs to his side only to be shot by one of Duncan’s men. Both Lynne and his wife die on the front entrance to the bank.

Joe goes into action from the roof opposite the bank and throws a few sticks of dynamite into  wagon which explodes causing panic and confusion amongst Duncan’s men. He then starts picking them off one by one. Duncan makes a retreat into Dr. Lynne’s house.


This scene was filmed on the Oasys/Mini Hollywood film set which today is a zoo and tourist attraction.



For a more detailed view of this site and other Spaghetti Western locations please visit my friend Yoshi Yasuda’s location site: http://y-yasuda.net/film-location.htm and Captain Douglas Film Locations http://www.western-locations-spain.com/